NEMESIS GAMES by James S. A. Corey

The fifth in the hopefully never ending series The Expanse, by those two guy who write under one name.  For what has gone before, just put the author’s name in the search box here.

This series is space opera and character development and epic story telling and some nifty imagined futuristic science, and all those good things wrapped up in a hard sci fi package set in the future future, where we have technology to reach the stars via the ‘Epstein Drive’,  which is a modified fusion drive invented by [the fictional] Solomon Epstein and which enabled humanity to travel beyond Earth and the inner planets and colonize the Asteroid Belt and outer planets.

The drive utilizes magnetic coil exhaust acceleration to increase drive efficiency, which enables spaceships to sustain thrust throughout the entire voyage. A ship fitted with the efficient Epstein drive is able to run the drive continuously for acceleration to its goal and then after flipping at about the halfway point is able to run the drive continuously during deceleration. Previous engine designs used propellant less efficiently and could not be run long enough to achieve the high velocities that the Epstein drive permitted.

Since its invention and up until the discovery of the Ring network, the Epstein drive remained the most advanced transportation technology humanity had access to.

 

In Cibola Burn, the protomolocule’s gate has opened the doors to innumerable worlds for humanity, and a movement to colonize new planets is underway. But, it’s not all good news for the solar system’s power struggle: Mars’ terraforming project is threatened by the mass exodus, and the Belt is seeing its own sources of supplies and resources dwindling.

At the start of Nemesis Games, the worst case scenario unfolds: Ships have begun to disappear across the solar system, and a brazen attack against Earth and Mars plunges the solar system into chaos. Each of the crew of the Rocinante are caught up in the action as the solar system is torn apart.  Nemesis Games turns into a complicated solar-political story: radicalized Belters declare war on the rest of the system, attempting to kill the political leaders of Earth and Mars, and worse. The undercurrents of racism and economic inequality that have shaped Corey’s world come up front and center.   We see a couple of serious points emerging out of the space opera story — that radical actions and movements don’t come out of thin air: they’re born out of inequality and racism, often at the hands of those who are willing to overlook the human cost of their actions. In the Belt, each day is survival, and there’s some clear parallels between the War on Terror and the actions of the OPA’s Free Navy (the radicals’ organization) movement.

And secondly, the violent actions of terrorists rarely speak for the entirety of a people: Rather, they’re conducted by individuals looking to expand their own power, latching on to whatever is convenient to get people to follow them and act in their name.

This was a humdinger, a page turned from beginning to end.  LOVE LOVE LOVE this series.

nem·e·sis
ˈneməsəs/
noun

– the inescapable agent of someone’s or something’s downfall,  archrival, adversary, foe, opponent, arch enemy

  • a long-standing rival; an archenemy.

-a downfall caused by an inescapable agent.

 

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2 comments on “NEMESIS GAMES by James S. A. Corey

  1. Phoghat says:

    Love this series, and I do NOT usually go in for a series

  2. Phoghat says:

    Reblogged this on Thoughts of The Brothers Karamuttsov and commented:
    Love this series, and I do NOT usually go in for a series

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